Lighting Decision Trees

Both California law and the RoHS Directive contain many exemptions that are applicable to lights. DTSC created four decision tree diagrams to help determine if an exemption applies or what concentrations of hazardous substances are allowed in your general purpose lights under California law.

First you need to know:  "Is it a general purpose light?"

If you know that it is a general purpose light, click on the type of light below to enter the decision tree.

Note: when navigating through decision trees you may use your browser "back arrow" to return to previous pages.

Incandescent Lighting Fluorescent Lamps Other Types of Lighting

This document summarizes California law and RoHS Directive provisions. It is intended solely as guidance. This document does not replace or supersede those laws. For the actual regulatory requirements you should consult California statutes and RoHS Directive provisions.

Lighting Products with RoHS Exemption

If a product is exempt from the RoHS MCV for a particular hazardous substance, the MCVs for the other hazardous substances still apply. For example, a lamp that is not a straight linear fluorescent lamp (e.g., u-bent, circular) may qualify for a RoHS Directive exemption from mercury restrictions and lead restrictions (for the lead contained in the glass tube) (see RoHS Directive exemptions, Applications 4 and 5). However, the RoHS MCVs for hexavalent chromium, PBBs or PBDEs, cadmium and other lead applications may still apply. California law contains exemptions for certain types of general purpose lights.

Lighting Products with HSC Exemption

If the Health and Safety Code exempts a category of lights, the RoHS MCVs for all hazardous substances described above would not apply to those lights. For example, compact fluorescent lights that are greater than 9 inches in length are exempted under Health and Safety Code section 25210.9, subdivision (f) until January 1, 2012. The MCVs do not apply to these types of lights until that date.