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Restrictions on the use of Certain Hazardous Substances in General Purpose Lights

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 Beginning January 1st of 2010, California will restrict the sale of general purpose lights by any person, including a manufacturer, retailer, distributor and online seller, if those lights contain certain hazardous substances above specific concentration limits

 
Introduction

Existing lighting choices for consumers contain toxic materials that, if released, can be harmful to public health and the environment. For example, incandescent bulbs may contain lead and fluorescent bulbs and tubes contain mercury.

Fluorescent lights are more efficient, effective, and economical than traditional incandescent bulbs, and have become increasingly popular lighting devices. However, when disposed of, fluorescent lights are considered hazardous wastes, therefore, these bulbs and tubes are prohibited from traditional disposal in California and should be taken to a Household Hazardous Waste facility or to a Take It Back partner .

While growth in use of energy-efficient fluorescent lighting is increasing the amount of mercury-containing waste produced, the US Environmental Protection Agency has concluded that shifting from incandescent lighting to compact fluorescent lighting will result in a net reduction in total United States mercury emissions due to the reduction of coal-fired electricity generation, a process that releases mercury into the atmosphere.

Concerned about the risk of mercury and lead exposure to the environment that could result from the disposal of used fluorescent and some incandescent lights, in 2007 the California State Legislature enacted the California Lighting Efficiency and Toxics Reduction Act or AB 1109 (Huffman, Ch. 534, Stats. 2007) to, in part, limit the amount of mercury and other hazardous substances allowed in general purpose lights. This law can be found in Health and Safety Code, division 20, Chapter 6.5, article 10.02 Lighting Toxics Reduction (Sections 25210.9- 25210.12).

In addition to restricting toxics in general purpose lights, AB 1109 also required the California Energy Commission adopt energy-efficiency standards through regulations; and required DTSC, in coordination with the California Integrated Waste Management Board, to convene a taskforce to make recommendations on methods for the proper management and collection of general purpose lights, including fluorescent bulbs and tubes.




Lighting Toxics Reduction and the EU RoHS Directive

Lighting Toxics Reduction (Article 10.02) and the EU RoHS Directive

Beginning January 1, 2010, Article 10.02 prohibits the sale of general purpose lights in California if they exceed hazardous substance concentration limits set forth in European Union(EU) legislation known as the RoHS Directive(Directive 2002/95/EC). The RoHS Directive establishes allowable maximum concentrations for the following hazardous substances: mercury, lead, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).

 

Article 10.02 (“Lighting Toxics Reduction”) also does the following:

 

o        Restricts, beginning January 1, 2010, a person from manufacturing for sale in California, general purpose lights that contain levels of hazardous substances that would be prohibited by the EU pursuant to the RoHS Directive. (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.9, subd. (a).)

 

o        Exempts high output and very high output linear fluorescent lamps greater than 32 millimeters in diameter, preheat linear fluorescent lamps, high intensity discharge lamps, and compact fluorescent lamps greater than nine inches in length.

 

o        Requires manufacturers of general purpose lights that are sold or offered for sale in California to provide technical documentation upon request to DTSC demonstrating that the general purpose lights comply with the EU RoHS Directive. (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.9, subd. (h).)

 

o        Requires manufacturers of general purpose lights to provide sellers of general purpose lights in California with certification that the lighting complies with the EU RoHS Directive, upon request. The certificate can be listed on the shipping container or on the packaging. (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.9, subd. (i).)

o        Restricts, beginning January 1, 2010, a person from selling general purpose lights from manufacturers who failed to provide required documentation or certification pursuant to Health and Safety Code section 25210.9, subdivisions (h) and (i).  (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.9, subd. (b)(2 & 3).)

 

This website summarizes California law and RoHS Directive provisions.  It does not replace or supersede those laws.  For the actual regulatory requirements you should consult California statutes and RoHS Directive provisions.




What is the RoHS Directive?

The RoHS Directive, the European Union legislation referenced in the California statutes on toxics in lighting, restricts the use of six hazardous substances in the manufacture of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE). The term EEE includes lighting equipment (as defined in Directive 2002/96/EC Annex IA and IB) and electric light bulbs and luminaries in households.  (2002/95/ EC and EU Commission Decision 2005/618/EC). 

 

The RoHS Directive restricts EEE containing lead, mercury, hexavalent chromium, cadmium, PBBs and PBDEs in amounts exceeding a maximum concentration value (MCV) from being put on the market. MCVs are set as follows by the RoHS Directive:

 

Hazardous Substance

MCV (% by weight) in homogeneous materials

Mercury

0.1 % (1000 ppm)

Lead

0.1 % (1000 ppm)

Hexavalent chromium

0.1 % (1000 ppm)

PBBs

0.1 % (1000 ppm)

PBDEs

0.1 % (1000 ppm)

Cadmium

0.01 % (100 ppm)

 

The RoHS Directive exempts certain applications of lead, mercury, cadmium and hexavalent chromium from these limits and in some cases establishes alternative limits. 




The RoHS Directive and lighting equipment

The RoHS Directive contains exemptions allowing mercury and certain applications of lead in lighting.  All other hazardous substances may not exceed the MCV as a percentage by weight per homogenous material (please see RoHS Directive exemptions for more details.  DTSC has created several flow charts as guidance outlining when these exemptions may be applicable).

The RoHS Directive contains many exemptions that may apply to lighting equipment, which are summarized below:

  • RoHS Application 1:  Mercury in compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) may not exceed 5 mg per lamp.

  • RoHS Application 2. Mercury in a straight fluorescent lamp that is used for general purpose may not exceed:

    10 mg in halophosphate lamps

    5 mg in triphosphate lamps with a normal lifetime

    8 mg in triphosphate lamps with a long lifetime

  • RoHS Application 3. No restrictions on the amount of mercury in a straight fluorescent lamp that is used for special purposes.

  • RoHS Application 4. No restrictions on the amount of mercury in other lamps not mentioned in – RoHS Directive Annex.

  • RoHS Application 5. No restrictions on the amount of lead in the glass of fluorescent tubes.

  • RoHS Application 6. Lead used as an alloying element in steel can contain up to 0.35% lead by weight, 0.4% lead by weight for aluminum and 4% lead by weight for copper alloy.

  • RoHS Application 7. No restrictions on lead used in high melting temperature type solders (i.e. tin-lead based alloys containing 85% by weight or more lead).

  • RoHS Application 16. No restrictions on lead used in linear incandescent lamps with silicate coated tubes.

  • RoHS Application 19. No restrictions on lead with PbBiSn-Hg and PbInSn-Hg in specific compositions as main amalgam and with PbSn-Hg as auxiliary amalgam in very compact Energy Saving Lamps (ESL)

California modeled its Lighting Toxics Reduction law after the European Union's (EU) RoHS Directive 2002/95/EC. Specific lighting applications of lead, mercury, cadmium and hexavalent chromium that are exempt from the EU RoHS Directive may also be exempt from California law.  It is very important to consult both the actual California law and RoHS Directive provisions to when determining whether an exemption applies. 

 

Links to Other Resources




Commonly Used Terms
Compact Fluorescents Lamps (CFLs)

Compact fluorescesnts lamps (CFLs) are usually single-based florescent lighting with a plug-in or screw-in base and are generally smaller and more compact than linear fluorescents. They include bare and covered CFLs, all wattages and all shapes (twist, loop, globe, a-shape, flood, bullet, candle flame, etc.). Some FL are designed to replace incandescent lighting in any type of lighting fixture. There are two general categories of FL:

  • FL with integrated ballast, which typically have a screw-in base
  • FL with non-integrated (separate) ballast, which often are pin-based



Incandescent lights (or lamp)
Incandescent lamps include traditional light bulbs that emit light by passing electric current through a filament, including halogen lamps. The California Energy Commission (CEC) has defined an "incandescent lamp" as "a glass enclosure in which light is produced by a filament of conducting material heated by an electric current". (Cal. Code Regs., tit. 20 § 1062, subd. (k).)



General purpose lights
Health and Safety Code section 25210.10 defines "general purpose lights" to include "lamps, bulbs, tubes, or other electric devices that provide functional illumination for indoor residential, indoor commercial, and outdoor use". Some examples may include:
  1. Compact Florescent lamps
  2. Straight (linear) fluorescent lamps
  3. Incandescent lights (including halogen)
  4. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)
The definition of "general purpose lights" excludes the following specialty lighting: appliance, black light, bug, colored, infrared, left-hand thread, marine, marine signal service, mine service, plant light, reflector, rough service, shatter resistant, sign service, silver bowl, showcase, three-way, traffic signal, and vibration service or vibration resistant.



Halophosphate fluorescent lamps

The inside of a fluorescent lamp is coated with a phosphor powder, which produces visible light when struck by ultraviolet light.  Various blends of phosphors are used in fluorescent lamps to determine the type of light emitted (cold, cool, warm, etc.).

Halophosphates are an older class of phosphors that are limited in their ability to provide a high coloring rendering index (CRI). A light tube’s or bulb’s CRI is a measure of how accurately the colors of objects appear under its light. The higher the number the closer the colors are to natural light.  Most halophosphate fluorescent lamps have a CRI of less than 80.

 

Most halophosphate straight (linear) lamps (LFLs) are T12 models.  Other less common halophosphate sizes include T8s, T9s and T5s as well as T6s and T17s.

 

Please note: Not all T12 lamps use halophosphate phosphors.  Some T12s, which typically have a CRI of 80 or more, are triphosphates.  As triphosphate fluorescent lamps, the triphosphate mercury requirements set forth in RoHS exemption-Application 2 may be applicable.

 

Also, some T12 triphosphate fluorescent lamps with a high CRI are considered linear fluorescent lights used for “special purpose” because they are designed to be shatter resistant or are used for displays, signage, backlighting, appliances, aquariums or as plant lights.  These may be exempted from EU RoHS requirements for mercury content under RoHS exemption-Application 3.




High output or very high output straight (linear) fluorescent lamps

Health and Safety Code section 25210.9, subdivision (e) exempts high output and very high output straight (linear) fluorescent lamps greater than 32 millimeters in diameter from the RoHS Directive hazardous substance restrictions.

 

“High output” and “very high output” straight (linear) fluorescent lamps usually have a lower starting temperature and a higher lumen output than standard fluorescents. The words “high output” or “very high output” are usually abbreviated on the bulb as HO or VHO.  These lamps are typically used for outdoor lighting, sign lighting, coolers and freezers.  The most common types are T12/HO or T12/VHO, but there are also some high output/very high output T5s and T8s.

 

The ballasts for high output and very high output lamps are usually larger than standards types and they tend to put out a lot more heat.  Some HO lamps also have a single pin end (T12s specifically) and others have a recessed double contact end which does not match up to fixtures designed for standard fluorescent light bulbs.

 

Some high output and very high output lamps used for general purpose lighting are covered under Section 25210.9, subdivision (e), while others are not.  In addition, mercury content may not be restricted in most T5 and T8 HO and VHO fluorescent lamps because under EU RoHS Directive exemptions they are often considered “straight fluorescent lamps for special purposes” (e.g. “lamps with special ignition features including those designed for low temperatures” or “amalgam” lamps).




Homogeneous material

The term “Homogeneous material” is defined in RoHS Directive guidance documents to mean “a material that cannot be mechanically disjointed into different materials.”  (Frequently Asked Questions on Directive 2002/95/EC on the Restriction of the Use of certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS) and Directive 2002/96/EC on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), p.17.)  

 

The guidance further defines homogeneous as “is of uniform composition throughout” and mechanically disjointed as “the materials can, in principle, be separated by mechanical actions such as: unscrewing, cutting, crushing, grinding, and abrasive processes.”  (Frequently Asked Questions on Directive 2002/95/EC on the Restriction of the Use of certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS) and Directive 2002/96/EC on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), p.17.)

Examples of “homogeneous materials” include individual types of glass, metals, alloys, resins and coatings.




Straight triphosphate fluorescent lamps with a long lifetime

The EU RoHS Directive contains an exemption for straight triphosphate fluorescent lamps with a long lifetime which is summarized below:

 

RoHS Application 2. Mercury in a straight fluorescent lamp may not exceed:

                8 mg in triphosphate lamps with a long lifetime

 

Health and Safety Code section 25210.9 references the current EU RoHS standards. However, the EU is currently debating the definition of “long” lifetime triphosphate lamps.  It has been proposed to amend the EU definition “long lifetime” to be > 25,000 hours when tested on a modern electronic ballast (equivalent to an “instant start” ballasts in the US) and turned on and off every 3 hours (“three hour starts”).  If the EU amends the RoHS Directive to incorporate this revised criterion for “long lifetime,” it may be applicable in California as well.

 

Generally, the term “standard life” is used by the lighting industry to describe a fluorescent lamp with a rated life of 24,000 hours or less, when tested on an electronic ballast with three hour starts. This is consistent with the current EU proposal to define “long lifetime” to mean having a rated life of > 25,000 hours.

 

Manufacturers usually label triphosphate fluorescent lamps with a life > 24,000 hours with a symbol or word to differentiate them from “normal” lifetime lamps (e.g., (LL) long life, (XLL) extra long life, PLUS, (XL) extra life, (SXL) super long life or (XP) extended performance).




Preheat fluorescent lamps

Health and Safety Code section 25210.9, subdivision (e) exempts preheat straight (linear) fluorescent lamps from RoHS Directive hazardous substance restrictions.

 

Preheat fluorescent lamps are designed to be used in fixtures with a starter - a switch that briefly allows electrical current to run through the lamp’s filaments.  The filaments heat the gas inside the lamp, which allows electricity to flow.  Preheat fluorescent lamps can be identified from their relatively short rated life (5,000 to 9,000 hours) and their relatively low CRI (50-70). The lamp life will usually be indentified in most manufacturers’ catalogs as the “average rated life”, and many of them are classified as halophosphates



Specialty Lighting

California law excludes “specialty lighting” from the definition of general purpose lights. Specialty lighting includes the following lights:

 

appliance, black light, bug, colored, infrared, left-hand thread, marine, marine signal service, mine service, plant light, reflector, rough service, shatter resistant, sign service, silver bowl, showcase, three-way, traffic signal, and vibration service or vibration resistant.




Straight (linear) fluorescent lamps

Straight (linear) fluorescent lamps generally have a double–pinned base. Their shape and size are expressed by means of a code consisting of the letter “T”, meaning the bulb is tubular, followed by a number. The number is the diameter of the bulb in eighths of an inch. (T2 – T12). Fluorescent tubes are available in lengths ranging between 6 inches and 96 inches (8 feet). The color properties of straight fluorescents lamps are determined by the phosphors used to coat the inside of the tube.

 

The EU RoHS Directive does not restrict the quantity of mercury in straight fluorescent lamps that do not fall into one of its specific exemption categories (see RoHS exemption- Application 4).

 

A guidance document issued by the United Kingdom (UK) Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) to assist those placing EEE on the market in the UK provides the following examples of lamps that are not subject to mercury restrictions: non-linear lamps such as u-bent and circular models, induction fluorescents, neon lamps and high intensity discharge lamps - including mercury vapor, high and low pressure sodium, and metal halide lamps.

 




Straight (linear) fluorescent lamp used for "special purposes"

The EU RoHS Directive does not restrict the quantity of mercury in fluorescent lamps for special purposes.

 

The UK Guidance lists the following examples of halophoshate fluorescent lamps used for “special purposes”: lamps used for tanning, lamps used in appliances such as refrigeration units, black lights (i.e., ultraviolet lights), aquarium and shatter-resistant models, long length lamps (greater than 1800mm in length), disinfection lamps with special components (e.g. integrated reflectors or external protection sleeves), lamps with special ignition features (e.g. designed for low temperatures), amalgam lamps, exit signs, and LCD back light lamps.  (This is list of examples and should not be considered all-inclusive.)



State regulated general service incandescent lamps

Health and Safety Code section 25210.9 subdivision (g) exempts “state-regulated general service incandescent lamps” and “enhanced spectrum lamps” as defined in subdivision (k) of Section 1602 of Title 20 of the California Code of Regulationsuntil January 1, 2014from hazardous substance restrictions.

 

The California Energy Commission defines a “state regulated general service incandescent lamp” as a standard incandescent or halogen type lamp that meets all of the following criteria:

 

1. It is intended for general service application and medium screw base;

2. It has a wattage rating > 25 watts and < 150 watts;

3. It has a rated voltage range at least partially within 110 and 130 volts;

4. It has a bulb finish of the frost, clear or soft white type; and

5. It has one of the following (or equivalent) shapes as defined in ANSI C78.20-2003: A-15,   

    A-19, A-21, A-23, A-25, PS-25, PS-30, BT-14.5, BT-15, CP-19, TB-19, CA-22.

 

The California Energy Commission has also definedenhanced spectrum lamps in regulation.  For more information on enhanced spectrum lamps, see subdivision (k) of Section 1602 of Title 20 of the California Code of Regulations.




Solder

The EU RoHS Directive contains an exemption for lead from MCV restrictions when it is used for “high temperature-type solders,” (see RoHS Exemption – Application 7)

 

UK guidance defines solder as “an alloy used to create metallurgical bonds between two or more metal surfaces to achieve an electrical and/or physical connection.

 

The UK guidance provides this information, which may be helpful in determining whether and when the “high temperature” exemption applies to solder used in lighting equipment:

 

“The high melting temperature type solder exemption has been introduced to allow the use of lead in solders for specific applications (such as in power semiconductor package manufacturing), for which viable lead-free alternatives have not yet been identified. This exemption is permitted as there are no alternative alloys with similar melting point and which are ductile. The high electrical conductivity and unique mechanical properties of such a high melting point tin-lead alloy make the material malleable and better able to withstand both temperature and physical stress. Such properties ensure fewer defects during manufacturing and high reliability throughout the life of the component, thereby also resulting in fewer components going into the waste stream.”




Triphosphate fluorescent lamps

The inside of a fluorescent lamp is coated with a phosphor powder, which produces visible light when struck by ultraviolet light. Various blends of phosphors are used in fluorescent lamps to determine the type of light emitted (cold, cool, warm, etc.).

 

Triphosphates (also referred to as “tri-band phosphates”) are a newer class of phosphors used to make fluorescent lamps that are more efficient than the older halophosphate type lamps. Most triphosphate fluorescent lamps have a relatively high CRI (>80) and a rated life of 15,000 hours or more.

 

Straight triphosphate fluorescent lamps are commonly available in five types:

  1. T5s (except preheat models)
  2. T8s (except preheat models)
  3. T10s
  4. T2s (if they are cold cathode tubes, these bulbs are exempted as “special purpose” lamps)
  5. T12s with a high CRI (usually >80) designed to run on an electronic ballast.




Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)


View all answers

Q. When testing incandescent light bulbs for lead, what parts would be considered a “homogenous material”?
A.

  Diagram of light parts

 

Homogeneous material” is defined in RoHS Directive guidance documents as “a material that cannot be mechanically disjointed into different materials.” There are many “homogenous materials” that make up an incandescent light bulb. These may include the bulb (the glass enclosure) (A), the filament (B) which may be a straight wire or a coil made of tungsten, a support wire (I), etc. Each of these would need to meet the requirements for lead set forth in the EU RoHS Directive (< 0.1% lead by weight).

Q. As a manufacturer am I required to provide certification to a seller for my “general purpose lights” sold in California?
A.

The law requires manufacturers of general purpose lights that are sold or offered for sale in California to provide, upon request, certification to sellers of those general purpose lights, that the lights are compliant with the RoHS Directive (Health & Saf. Code, § 25210.9, subd. (h).). A manufacturer may comply with this requirement by displaying the certification on the shipping container or packaging of general purpose lights. 

Q. As a manufacturer, am I required to submit documentation to DTSC for my “general purpose lights” sold in California?
A.

The law requires manufacturers of general purpose lights that are sold or offered for sale in California to prepare technical documentation or other information showing that the lights comply with the requirements of the RoHS Directive (Health & Saf. Code, § 25210.9, subd. (h).). However, this documentation must only be provided to DTSC upon request, within 28 days of the date of the request (Health & Saf. Code, § 25210.9, subd. (h).).  DTSC encourages manufacturers to have technical documentation readily available for all “general purpose lights” determined to be subject to the RoHS requirements in order to respond to any DTSC request in a timely manner.

Q. Are there any exemptions that allow lead in light bulbs?
A.

The RoHS Directive exempts certain applications of lead, which may be applicable to the construction of light bulbs. One exemption is for “lead used in high melting temperature type solders”. For incandescent bulbs, an electrical contact is made by soldering one lead-in wire to the center contact in the base of the bulb and the other is soldered to the upper rim of the base shell. If the solder used for this purpose meets the criteria for “high melting temperature type solder,” it may be exempt from RoHS’s lead restrictions under RoHS exemption – Application 7.

 

Another exemption, RoHS exemption – Application 6, allows the concentration of lead used as an alloying element in steel, aluminum and copper alloy to exceed 0.1 percent lead by weight. For steel, the maximum concentration value (MCV) is 0.35 percent by weight; for aluminum the MCV is 0.4 percent by weight; and for copper alloy, the MCV can be up to 4 percent by weight.

 

For further guidance please refer to the DTSC flow chart for incandescent lamps.

Q. Are luminaries considered a “general purpose light” as that term is defined in Health and Safety Code section 25210.10?
A.

A luminaire may or may not be a general purpose light. General purpose lights are defined in the Health and Safety Code as: “lamps, bulbs, tubes, or other electric devices that provide functional illumination for indoor residential, indoor commercial, and outdoor use.” (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.10.) Health and Safety Code Section 25210.10 is silent as to whether “luminaires” would be considered a general purpose light.   

 

 There are many different types of luminaires. Research indicates that the term “luminaire” is generally used to refer to a light fixture, a light unit, or in some cases the entire body of a freestanding lamp. Various regulatory agencies, including the California Energy Commission, define “luminaire” as “the complete lighting unit, consisting of fluorescent lamp or lamps, together with parts designed to distribute the light, to position and protect such lamps and to connect such lamps to the power supply through the ballast.” In some cases, a luminaire may include a lamp, bulb or tube. Because there are many different types of luminaires, a determination of whether or not a specific luminaire is a general purpose light needs to be made on a case-by-case basis.

Q. Is a ballast considered a part of a general purpose light as that term is defined in Health and Safety Code section 25210.10?
A.

A ballast may or may not be part of a “general purpose light.” Statute defines the term general purpose lights to mean: “lamps, bulbs, tubes, or other electric devices that provide functional illumination for indoor residential, indoor commercial and outdoor use” (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.10.). Section 25210.10 is silent as to whether a ballast would be considered a “general purpose light” for purposes of that section.

 

In response to a letter from Universal Lighting Technologies, DTSC considered the question of whether a separate ballast located inside a lighting device would constitute part of a “general purpose light” for purposes of Health and Safety Code section 25210.10. Based on the information submitted to DTSC, DTSC opined that ballasts that are not integrated into the lighting device or ballasts that are separately located from the general purpose lighting device would not be considered general purpose lights for purposes of Health and Safety Code section 25210.10. In contrast, ballasts (or similar component such as an LED driver) that are integrated into the discrete component of the light, such as a screw-in compact fluorescent lamp, would be considered a general purpose light and the RoHS requirements would apply to the entire discrete component, including the ballast.  For a copy of this letter, click here

Q. Are light bulbs in toys and other devices that contain small discrete lighting considered general purpose lights as that term is defined in Health and Safety Code section 25210.10?
A.

Statute defines the term “general purpose lights” to mean: “lamps, bulbs, tubes, or other electric devices that provide functional illumination for indoor residential, indoor commercial, and outdoor use” (Health & Saf. Code § 25210.10).  Generally light bulbs in toys and other devices are not intended to provide “functional illumination for indoor or commercial use or outdoor use” and are therefore not considered “general purpose lights” as defined in Health and Safety Code section 25210.10.

Q. I have read the RoHS Directive and I noticed it references the WEEE Directive. How do these two directives relate to one another?
A.

The RoHS Directive incorporates the definition of “electrical and electronic equipment”

 (EEE) (which includes “lighting equipment”) from the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive (EU Directive 2002/96/EC). The WEEE Directive is a European Union law designed to promote the recycling of EEE by making manufacturers responsible for the products they make when they are no longer needed. WEEE specifically lists the following examples of lighting equipment:

 

o        Luminaries for fluorescent lamps with the exception of luminaries in households;

o        Straight fluorescent lamps;

o        Compact fluorescent lamps;

o        High intensity discharge lamps, including pressure sodium lamps and metal halide lamps;

o        Low pressure sodium lamps; and

o        Other lighting or equipment for the purpose of spreading or controlling light with the exception of filament bulbs.

 

In addition to the above specific examples, the RoHS Directive also applies to electric light bulbs and luminaires in households.

 

Within the RoHS Directive is a list of exemptions for certain uses of the hazardous substances covered by the directive – lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). When determining if an exemption applies to a specific product, please read the exemption carefully as most of the exemptions apply only to very specific applications of one of the hazardous substances covered by the directive. 

Q. As a retailer, after January 1, 2010, can I still sell my existing stock of lighting even though those lights may not comply with AB 1109 restrictions?
A.

Yes. All lights, including general purpose lights, manufactured prior to January 1, 2010 can be sold or offered for sale by a retailer after January 1, 2010. However, all general purpose lights purchased by retailers from manufacturers and distributors after January 1, 2010 that fall within the scope of AB 1109 must comply with all applicable restrictions unless the retailer can show the general purpose lights were manufactured prior to January 1, 2010.



 
 
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