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Brake Pad Timeline

The activities listed below are efforts being conducted by either the DTSC, the Society of Automotive Engineers or the State of Washington Department of Ecology.

Brake Pad Timeline



  • September 27, 2010
    Hazardous Materials: Motor Vehicle Brake Friction Materials Law adopted

  • December 12, 2011
    SAE Standard J2975, Measurement of Copper and Other Elements in Brake Friction Materials approved

  • January 31, 2012
    State of Washington Better Brake Rules Workshop

  • May 23, 2012
    State of Washington Department of Ecology anticipates publishing draft CR-102

  • June 21, 2012
    State of Washington Department of Ecology closes public review period for CR-102

  • June 21, 2012
    State of Washington Department of Ecology holds first public hearing on draft rule CR-102

  • July 16, 2012
    SAE Standard J866, Friction Coefficient Identification and Environmental Marking System for Brake Linings approved

  • July 23, 2012
    State of Washington Department of Ecology holds second public hearing on draft rule CR-102

  • October 17, 2012
    State of Washington Department of Ecology files - Final version of CR-102

  • January 9, 2013
    DTSC issues guidelines on selecting a testing certification agency

  • September 27, 2013
    State of California passes Assembly Bill (AB) 501. AB 501 adds language to the California Brake Pad Law that allows motor vehicle dealers to continue to sell or offer for sale brake friction material not certified as compliant with the January 1, 2014 requirements if the brake friction material was installed on a vehicle before the vehicle was acquired by the dealer.

  • October 2, 2013
    State of Washington Department of Ecology issues "Guidelines for Marking Brake Friction Material" requirements under the Better Brakes law.

  • December 20, 2013
    Updated version of SAE Standard J2975, Measurement of Copper and Other Elements in Brake Friction Materials approved.

  • January 1, 2014
    On and after January 1, 2104, the law requires brake pads sold in California to be certified by a testing certification agency (aka., registrar) and marked by the manufacturer as compliant with the following restrictions:
          •  Cadmium exceeding 0.01% by weight
          •  Chromium (VI) salts exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Lead exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Mercury exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Asbestiform fibers exceeding 0.1% by weight

          Motor vehicle manufacturers and distributors, wholesalers, or retailers of replacement brake friction
          materials may continue to offer for sale brake friction materials not certified as compliant solely for
          the purpose of depletion of inventories.

  • January 1, 2015
    State of Washington’s law and regulation become effective. Brake pads and shoes manufactured after January 1, must not contain asbestos, hexavalent chromium, mercury, cadmium, or lead. Auto shops and other distributors of brakes will be able to sell any existing inventory for ten years.

  • January 21, 2015
    Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Environmental Council of the States and the brake friction material industry was signed to adopt voluntary standards based on Washington and California’s brake laws in the other 48 states.

  • April 8, 2016
    OAL publishes formal rulemaking notice in the California Regulatory Notice Register, Volume 15-Z. This date is also the beginning of the 45-day public comment period.

  • May 23, 2016
    The 45-day public comment period closes.

  • May 27, 2016
    The public hearing on the proposed brake pad regulations is held.  The video of the public hearing is available here.

  • June 30, 2016
    The 15-day public comment period closes.

  • August 18, 2016
    DTSC submits final rulemaking package to OAL. OAL starts their review of the final rulemaking package.

  • September 30, 2016
    Office of Administrative Law and the Secretary of State approve the California Brake Friction Material Requirements regulations.

  • January 1, 2017
    The California Brake Friction Material Requirements regulations become effective.

  • January 1, 2019
    On and after January 1, 2019, a manufacturer may request an extension to the January 1, 2025 requirements. DTSC will charge the manufacturer a fee for each extension application submitted.

  • January 1, 2021
    On and after January 1, 2021, the law requires brake pads sold in California to be certified by a testing certification agency (aka., registrar) and marked by the manufacturer as compliant with the following restrictions:

          •  Cadmium exceeding 0.01% by weight
          •  Chromium (VI) salts exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Copper exceeding 5% by weight
          •  Lead exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Mercury exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Asbestiform fibers exceeding 0.1% by weight

  • December 31, 2023
    Motor vehicle manufacturers and distributors, wholesalers, or retailers of replacement brake friction materials may no longer offer for sale brake friction materials that do not comply with the January 1, 2014 restrictions.

  • January 1, 2025
    On and after January 1, 2025, the law requires brake pads sold in California to be certified by a testing certification agency (aka., registrar) and marked by the manufacturer as compliant with the following restrictions:

          •  Cadmium exceeding 0.01% by weight
          •  Chromium (VI) salts exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Copper exceeding 0.5% by weight
          •  Lead exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Mercury exceeding 0.1% by weight
          •  Asbestiform fibers exceeding 0.1% by weight

  • December 31, 2029
    The last day DTSC will accept an extension application to an existing extension for light- and medium-duty vehicles.

  • January 1, 2030
    On and after January 1, 2030, brake friction material manufacturers for heavy-duty vehicles (a vehicle weighing over 26,000 lbs gross weight) may apply for an extension to the January 1, 2025 requirements for an existing extension.

 
 
September 27, 2010 September 27, 2010 December 12, 2011 December 12, 2011 January 31, 2012 January 31, 2012 May 23, 2012 May 23, 2012 June 21, 2012 June 21, 2012 June 21, 2012 July 16, 2012 July 16, 2012 July 23, 2012 July 23, 2012 October 17, 2012 October 17, 2012 January 9, 2013 January 9, 2013 September 27, 2013 September 27, 2013 October 2, 2013 October 2, 2013 December 20, 2013 December 20, 2013 January 1, 2014 January 1, 2014 January 1, 2015 January 1, 2015 January 21, 2015 January 21, 2015 April 8, 2016 April 8, 2016 May 23, 2016 May 23, 2016 May 27, 2016 May 27, 2016 June 30, 2016 June 30, 2016 August 18, 2016 August 18, 2016 September 30, 2016 September 30, 2016 January 1, 2017 January 1, 2017 January 1, 2019 January 1, 2019 January 21, 2021 January 21, 2021 December 31, 2023 December 31, 2023 January 1, 2025 January 1, 2025 December 31, 2029 December 31, 2029 January 1, 2030 January 1, 2030